Authors

Anne Colby

Anne Colby
Anne Colby is Consulting Professor at Stanford University. Prior to that, she was director of the Henry Murray Research Center at Harvard University and then Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She is co-author of The Measurement of Moral Judgment; Some Do Care: Contemporary Lives of Moral Commitment; Educating Citizens; Educating Lawyers; Educating for Democracy; Educating Engineers; and Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education. Colby is also co-editor of Ethnography and Human Development: Context and Meaning in Human Inquiry; Competence and Character through Life; and Looking at Lives: American Longitudinal Studies of the Twentieth Century (2002). A life-span developmental psychologist, Colby holds a B.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. in psychology from Columbia University.

Thomas Ehrlich

Thomas Ehrlich
Thomas Ehrlich is a Visiting Professor at the Stanford University School of Education. From 2000 to 2010 he was a Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He has previously served as president of Indiana University, provost of the University of Pennsylvania, and dean of Stanford Law School. He was also the first president of the Legal Services Corporation in Washington, DC, and the first director of the International Development Cooperation Agency, reporting to President Carter. After his tenure at Indiana University, he was a Distinguished University Scholar at California State University and taught regularly at San Francisco State University. He is author, co-author, or editor of 13 books. He is a trustee of Mills College, and has been a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania and Bennett College. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School and holds five honorary degrees.

William M. Sullivan

William M. Sullivan
William Sullivan is Senior Scholar at the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College. He was formerly Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, where he co-directed the Preparation for the Professions Program. His books include Educating Lawyers, Work and Integrity, A New Agenda for Higher Education, Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life, and The Good Society. Prior to working at the Carnegie Foundation, Sullivan was professor of philosophy at LaSalle University. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Fordham University.